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R'lyeh

  • Smoked Baltic Porter
  • Octane rating: 6.3%vol.
R'lyeh

"Between the real and the unreal there it lies
Wonder of flashlight nightmares and measureless eons
Where the Earth's supreme terror slumbers
Boundless city of asymmetrical shapes
Loathsome and concealed from the unbelieving
No human mind can comprehend its content
Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn"

R'lyeh

The Background Story

At the turn of the 20th century, human society increased its reliance upon science, thereby offering new knowledge and a more accurate, thorough understanding of the world in which we live. This was directly reflected in all genres of literature, with authors favoring the construction of mythical realities in the backdrop of literary realism.

The most prominent of such authors was a contemporary, American writer from Providence, Rhode Island, named Howard Philips Lovecraft. Lovecraft brought to light several of the most significant works of horror fiction to human history, such as “The Call of Cthulhu” and “The Shadow over Innsmouth” both of which were canonical to the so-called Cthulhu Mythos. The latter is the name given to the superficial elements of Lovecraft’s tales: extra-terrestrial gods and entities, magical grimoires, and fictional New England towns.

The imaginary depth of Lovecraft’s horror literature has become fundamental inspiration in popular culture since its release and still to this day. The unique core of his tales is based on the fundamental premise that accepted human laws, interests, and emotions have neither validity nor significance within the incomprehensible vastness of the cosmos, that the human mind is inherently unable to understand the contents and correlates within such a vastness, and that such awareness of our powerlessness not only is horrifying in and of itself, but renders the possibility of actual horrors within the unknown overwhelming.

Through the ominous black substance of our beer, R’lyeh, just as in Lovecraft’s coined “black seas of infinity,” we honor his literary work which reveals a terrifying glimpse of the truth that lurks behind our comprehension, between the real and unreal. Embrace the fear of the unknown!

The fine prints

This brew is a monumental homage to the entire work and legacy of the American horror fiction writer H.P. Lovecraft [1890-1937].

The name of the label is after the name of the remote and concealed city “R’lyeh” mentioned in the tale “The Call of Cthulhu” [1926] by H.P. Lovecraft. R’lyeh was the place where Cthulhu and the Old Ones are slumbering before taking over the human world.

The visual aesthetics for this label are inspired by the film "The Call of Cthulhu" [2005] by H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society (HPLHS) and the film “Das Kabinett des Doktor Caligari” (The Cabinet of the Doctor Caligari) [1920] by Robert Wiene [1873-1938].

The illustration of R’lyeh was done using pure pencil drawing technique. The imagery was influenced by the R’lyeh’s interpretation in the film "The Call of Cthulhu" [2005]; apposite to its asymmetrical architecture (non-Euclidean geometry), dreamlike and surreal yet grim, mystical and inviting.

The “Dream door” that appears in the visual is derived from the very same door of the dream sequence from the film "The Call of Cthulhu" [2005].

The logo font is inspired by Victorian font style as allegory of the fascination by H.P. Lovecraft for the refinement and ideals of the Victorian era.

There are a couple of dots in the structure of the label that discretely suggest Cthulhu’s eyes and the whole label as depiction of the head of Cthulhu himself.


Flavour profile

Nightmarish Baltic porter with a thick oily body and flavour of chocolate and raisins rounded by birch smokiness and firm malt tones just like Cthulhu's blood. Explore the regions beyond the human comprehension and embrace the new Dark Age!

Formula

Malts: Munich Type I, Beech smoked malt, Abbey, Melanoidin, Special W, Chocolate, Black and Wheat malt

Bittering hops: Magnum

Aroma hops: Fuggles

IBU: 25

Availability

Available in late November

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